Researchers suggest the provision of education and coaching on dietary habits, including eating speed, may be effective in preventing diabetes

Diabetes drugs and equipment

Eating fast is an independent risk factor for developing diabetes, according to a study published in BMJ Open.

The retrospective cohort study used administrative claims and health check-up data from a health insurance database for fiscal years 2010–2015.

A total of 15,474 males without diabetes aged between 40 and 74 years were included and categorised based on their eating speeds (fast, normal, and non-fast). The determination of diabetes onset was based on HbA1c levels, as well as diagnoses and drug prescriptions according to health insurance claims.

Of the total study population, 620 developed diabetes during the 5-year study period. A univariate analysis revealed that eating fast was associated with a 35% increased risk of developing diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.55). Having a low income was also significantly associated with the onset of diabetes (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.24–1.74).

After adjusting for age, obesity, and comorbidities, both eating fast (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.02–1.35) and having a low income (OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.03–1.50) were shown to be independent risk factors for diabetes onset.

Since eating speed can be controlled, the study authors suggest that the provision of education and coaching on dietary habits, including eating speed, may be effective in preventing diabetes onset.

This article originally appeared on Univadis, part of the Medscape Professional Network.

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